Roundup No. 13: Remote Climate Disaster Response

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Welcome back to another Weekly Roundup, Remote Work Tribe! Before we dive into this week’s trending topics, we wanted to first check in with our readers. Climate disaster after climate disaster have riddled the globe this month, and our thoughts are with anyone who has been displaced from or lost their home.

Wildfires are currently raging across the West Coast of the U.S. The National Weather Service has officially had to switch to the Greek alphabet after running out of conventional storm names for just the second time in history. And coastal flooding has uprooted those in Alabama, Florida, Haiti, and Dominican Republic. 

Considering the majority of countries are also battling a global pandemic, now is a good time to check-in with yourself and your team. Take a much-deserved mental health day. 

Cartoon of cursor closing out of all open tabs with the message Out of Office

Once you give yourself some downtime, consider how you or your team would respond in the face of a climate disaster. While many physical office locations have a disaster preparedness plan, the topic of evacuation or relocation doesn’t always pop up in a remote worker’s handbook. 

Rhiannon Payne, author of the upcoming Remote Work Era and remote work advocate, brought this issue to the forefront this week. 

Rhiannon also revealed that of the 50+ interviews about remote work and team leadership she completed for her book, just one interviewee raised concern over a climate disaster check-list. Fortunately, it seems some companies have taken this concern into mind as well. 

While climate disaster types will vary based on location, it certainly seems reasonable that remote companies with employees in Southern California should create internal policies accordingly. What happens if an employee must relocate overnight and needs an extension on deadlines? What happens if a remote worker loses their technology to fire or flood and can’t communicate with their team?

There are hundreds of “what if” scenarios. Having a plan reduces the stress and anxiety surrounding an already hectic topic. 

Cartoon characters responding to climate disaster saying "There's no need to panic. I have a plan"

But, before you go create your climate disaster preparedness plan, check out what else was happening in the world of remote work this week! 

The Tribe’s Weekly Vibes

1. This highly critical reminder that we know caught us all slacking.

2.  This life lesson that talking negatively about your team is simply not the tribe’s vibe.

3. This proof of trousers being optional in a Zoom call, even if you’re speaking with one of the world’s largest media outlets (*mic drop*). 

4. This reminder that BURNOUT IS REAL.

5. This drool-worthy approach to meetings.

6.  This reminder to always remain open and honest with your managers.

7.  This perfect response to employee growth. 

8. This hot take on cutting salaries for remote workers. 

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What’s happening in your remote world this week? Tag us over on Instagram, @TheRemoteWorkTribe, or on Twitter, @RemoteWorkTribe, for a chance to be featured on our next weekly thread!

Archie Comic cartoon characters running out of room and slamming door closed
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By Grace Trumpfeller